Seaweed and thyroid health

This is my favourite health snack these days. It looks a little funny and has an interesting texture but I actually enjoy its salty taste. Plus, it makes me feel like a mermaid when I eat it!

“Wakame is an edible brown seaweed or kelp common in Japanese, Korean, and Chinese cuisines.” (Source) I eat it dry as shown in the picture above (although, I’m not sure you’re supposed to so comment below if you know!) or use it in homemade miso soup. I also read you can add some to your bath water for a beneficial seaweed soak! I will definitely be trying that…

This amazing sea plant is so nutrient-dense, despite being low in calories, it helps me feel satiated until I can finish prepping a healthy meal.

But the three main reasons I love Wakame are:

  1. Iodine: this is probably your thyroid gland’s best friend*. It keeps it in balance and is necessary for the release of thyroid hormones.
  2. Magnesium: if you’re not already, you’ll soon get tired of me raving about magnesium! This mineral is necessary for the proper contraction and relaxation of muscles. Plus, it’s been said that people with hyper- or hypo-thyroid conditions are likely deficient.
  3. Fucoxanthin: this is an antioxidant from the carotenoids family. It has anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and even fat-burning properties.

Just don’t overdo it with seaweed. It has super high levels of sodium so, like anything else, moderation is key!

Plus, *some thyroid conditions apparently don’t like too much iodine – normally when it’s in supplement form. Always check with a medical professional if you are concerned ๐Ÿ˜‰

M.

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